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I love whole wheat. Besides the gritty texture (which I really do like), it assuages my guilt of only eating white flour for all those other times when I’m baking. You may not realize it since the majority of the recipes I’ve posted have been sugary and/or fatty delicious baked goods, but I actually have a keen interest in the nutritional content of foods that I eat, and I LOVE when I find that I can replace something less nutritionally-dense for something better. Thus, my love of whole wheat in my favorite baked goods.

Another Smitten Kitchen smash hit, this recipe cuts the sweet taste of raspberries with ricotta cheese and has a defined texture, thanks to the addition of whole wheat. Overall, they are good, though not my favorite scone that I’ve made. Just like with my apple cheddar scones, I froze most of these before I baked them and then I would pop them out of the freezer one at a time when I wanted a scone for breakfast (best idea ever, Smitten Kitchen! Thanks!).*

As Deb from Smitten Kitchen notes, the dough used for this recipe is VERY sticky and damp. Resist the temptation to add additional flour – just use as much as you need on your surface and your hands. The end result will be well worth this sticky situation.

 

Raspberry Ricotta Whole Wheat Scones:
From Smitten Kitchen

1 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon table salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
1 cup fresh raspberries
3/4 cup whole milk ricotta (I used light ricotta, it still tasted good but would probably be better with whole milk ricotta)
1/3 cup heavy cream

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. In the bottom of a large bowl, whisk flours, baking powder, sugar and salt together.Add the butter and use the blender to both cut the butter into the flour mixture until the biggest pieces are the size of small peas. Toss in raspberries and use the blender again to break them into halves and quarter berry sized chunks. Add the ricotta and heavy cream together and stir them into the dough (using a flexible spatula is the best way to do this). The dough will look messy – that’s a good thing!

With as few movements as possible, transfer the dough to a well-floured counter, flour the top of the dough and pat it into a 7-inch square about 1-inch tall. With a large knife, divide the dough into 9 even squares. Transfer the scones to prepared baking sheet with a spatula. Bake the scones for about 15 minutes, until lightly golden at the edges. Cool in pan for a minute, then transfer to a cooling rack. These scones are best when they’ve cooled halfway (or more) so they can set. If you need a little practice with the virtue of patience, these are the scones for you!

P.S. Aren’t square scones the cutest?

* To freeze unbaked scones simply cut the dough into desired scone shape, place them on a tray in the freezer, freeze until they are hard, and then you can put them into ziplock bags and leave them until you’re ready for a hot scone for breakfast or an afternoon snack. The best part? You don’t even have to thaw them, just add a couple minutes to the baking time and you are good to go.

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